What’s with all the Sunflowers?

by

phs-09-bella-italia-07

Confession: When I first saw the sunflowers they were using to promote Bella Italia, I was a bit confused. I associate all sorts of things with Italy—you know, canals, pizza, Prada—but not sunflowers.

 

So I decided to do some exhaustive research. OK, fine, I just googled the words “sunflower Italy.” But when I did I found more than a million hits. And after some reading I learned that there’s a strong connection between the two. Therefore, allow me to drop some knowledge.

 

Get this, the sunflower is actually a U.S. native, but can now be found all over because people clamor for its coveted oil. In Italy the plant is called girasole, which translates to “sun turner.” This is due to the sunflower’s instinct to grow in the direction of the sun, a phenomenon known as—big word alert—heliotropism.

 

As Diane Lane could tell you, the hillsides of Tuscany are ideal for sunflower spotting. I browsed through dozens of photos online and was awestruck by the beauty; some images looked like a never-ending sea of gold. So, as you can imagine, I’m now even more excited for the Show’s debut on March 1. Save money by buying your tickets in advance at www.theflowershow.com.

sunflowerfield   

3 Responses to “What’s with all the Sunflowers?”

  1. Alice Calhoun Says:

    I’m pretty excited about the choice of the sunflower as the show flower this year, so I have designed four new copper sunflower faeries who will have their debut at the show this year in my Marketplace booth #408. Think Project Runway in a Tuscan field and all the faerie designers have to use is sunflowers for dresses, hats, etc.

  2. Cathy Says:

    Hi, I attended this years Show. Can you tell me who was the artist that painted the very large sunflower with the red, window frame around it, surrounded by schrubs and hydrangeas? Thank you. Also, love your copper artwork too! Good day. Cathy

  3. Alan Jaffe Says:

    The sunflower appeared on the exhibit created by Burke Brothers Landscape Contractors. It was painted by 3rd and 5th grade students of Rydal Elementary School and was designed by their art teacher. There are plans under way to display the sunflower permanently at the school.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: